A Manifesto for Post-Agile Software Development


In nearly 15 years since the Agile manifesto was penned, an entire generation of the software industry has grown up having known only ‘Agile’ methodologies. Their experience has not been entirely positive.

The ‘new’ criticisms made against agile – that is, by those who have grown up with it, not those who opposed it in the first place – are rarely criticisms of the agile manifesto. They are, often, reactions against the (abusive) experience of being pushed into processes, behaviours & relationships which are unsatisfactory; whilst at the same being stripped of any power to improve them.

We should always react against people being pushed about, and made powerless.

A manifesto is a small thing. It can fall on deaf ears. It can be interpreted to mean the opposite of what was intended, it can be misused to manipulate people. But if we make the effort to keep in touch with each other, and to keep trying to re-state what was meant, it can continue to be a valuable guide. And so I propose a 15th anniversary postscript.

Manifesto for Post-Agile Software Development: A Postscript

  • The agile manifesto was not and is not a prescription for people to impose conformity, nor a tool for controlling people.
  • There is a deeper theme to agile. At the core it is based on trust and respect, promoting workplace relationships which value people. We oppose methods, structures and behaviours which reduce respect and trust, and which reduce people to assets with no power.
  • Agile will always demand shared learning and shared improvement. Without critical reflection and learning – both from their own experiences and from the wider community – teams cannot remain agile. Without improvement based on that learning, ‘agile’ becomes fossilization.

Manifesto for Agile Software Development: A Reminder of the Original

The Agile Manifesto:

We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value:

  • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
  • Working software over comprehensive documentation
  • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
  • Responding to change over following a plan

That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.


You may wonder why the term ‘post-agile’. It may be pointless, but it’s already in use, so we could choose to go along with those who want to learn, change and improve on their experience of ‘agile’.

As I see it, there are two essentials to agile: treating people well; and never stop learning. Each of these two is only truly possible when the other is also practised.

  • The phrase and much of the bullet point ‘There is a deeper theme…’ comes from About the Manifesto.
  • The emphasis on continuous learning is for some so obvious as to need no explanation. But some are stuck in a so-called "agile" process which they are powerless to change or improve. The irony of naming such an structure ‘Agile’ would be funny if it weren’t so painful.
    • Ron Jeffries’s reaction to criticisms of Scrum has been: "The essence of what makes Scrum work isn’t the three roles, the five meetings, the one artifact. It’s Inspect and Adapt. When things are not going as you like, you’re supposed to fix it."
    • To cry out that without continuous learning and change there is no agile, can be a powerful tool for the disempowered.
    • Calling for change in a broken process can become a step towards changing broken relationships.


The main alternative to a ‘post-agile’ slogan is surely Alastair Cockburn’s ‘Heart of Agile’.

A rather rushed and incomplete bibliography

Draft – Comment & Contribution Welcome.

WordPress – Unable to create directory – Is its parent directory writable by the server?

One of the annoyances of teh interwebs (mostly stackexchange, actually, but not in this case) is when the wrong answer comes top of the google rankings for a common question.

So here’s my contribution to making WordPress Forums for Unable to create directory – Is its parent directory writable by the server? the top google hit for this problem.

The problem, for me and many others, is not directory permissions but the path-to-uploads setting. Fix it by logging in with your admin account, and correct the path in:

Settings -> Media -> Uploading Files : Store uploads in this folder

WordPress Settings Media Upload Path

Why was it incorrect in the first place? Because I had changed hosting provider.

Use a Windows NTFS, or Linux, or other–formatted disk for Apple Time Machine Backups

It is well known that you have to use an Apple formatted disk (HFS+) for Time Machine Backups and you can’t use an NTFS formatted disk, or any of the preferred *nix disk formats with Time Machine.

Except you can.

Gotchas And Caveats

It’s not always a first choice option:

  • If your Windows drive is connected over USB2, it will be much slower than a Mac disk connected over Thunderbolt or FireWire. My first backup of 120GB took about 10 hours, aka all night. But that was still better than no backup whilst waiting for a new drive to arrive in the post.
  • The backup volume will not auto-mount when you plug the drive in. You must manually double-click the <YourMachineName>.sparsebundle in the Finder each time you plug the drive in. After that, Time Machine backups will run as normal.


  • Plug in your foreign-formatted disk and get a read/write driver for it
  • Save the the script from tmMakeImage script in, for instance, your Downloads directory.
  • Open a terminal window.
  • If you saved to Downloads, then something like this should make the script executable and show you command line usage:
    cd ~/Downloads
    chmod a+x tmMakeImage
    mv tmMakeImage /usr/local/bin
  • So if your external drive has a Volume called WinDrive, and your Mac drive is about 250GB then this command should initialise it for Time Machine backups:
    tmMakeImage 500GB /Volumes/WinDrive GO
  • Optionally, follow up with an immediate tmutil startbackup

Opening the Time Machine preferences should now show that you have “Time Machine Backups” selected as your backup drive. Don’t forget to double-click the sparsebundle each time you attach the drive, to mount your Backup Volume and allow Time Machine to do its stuff.


Using Sparsebundles to create HFS+ formatted drive on a ‘foreign’ disk format

Apple created, it seems, sparse images and sparse bundles to solve the problem of saving backups on a network drive. Time Machine uses and recognises them. It will even auto-mount the sparsebundle disk image when you re-attach the drive in order to start running a backup.

Local drives and network drives

Most instructions on the web focus on network drives. Good instructions without any command-line stuff is here: http://www.hciguy.com/2010/06/16/using-time-machine-to-backup-your-mac-to-an-ntfs-drive-over-the-network-running-win-7/ For network drives, the sparsebundle name includes your Mac’s MAC address which it doesn’t need to for a locally-connected drive.

Things Under the Hood of Time Machine Disks

  • You can’t create a sparsebundle directly on a network or ‘foreign’ drive so the typical thing is to create it on your machine first, and then copy it to its final destination.
  • Sparsebundles don’t use up empty space. An sparsebundle declared as 500GB but still empty will only take up a few megabytes of real disk space.
  • A sparsebundle used by Time Machine has a com.apple.TimeMachine.MachineID.plist file in the package, which contains the UUID of the physical machine it belongs to. This stops you accidentally using backups on the ‘wrong’ machine. (Time Machine does let you browse and use ‘wrong’ backups though).
  • A Time Machine drive must have “Ignore ownership permissions” Off, whereas by default the Mac mounts external drives with “Ignore ownership permissions” set to On. This setting is not stored on the drive itself; it’s stored on your machine and can be specified each time the drive is mounted (man hdiutil) or specified permanently (man vsdbutil)
  • You can set the Time Machine destination to a sparsebundle on an attached drive by first mounting it then doing tmutil setdestination /Volumes/Volumenameonceitsbeenmounted. You mount the image either by double-clicking it in Finder, or with hdiutil attach /path/to/image.
  • Learn More:
    man tmutil
    man hdiutil
    man vsdbutil
  • You can still use your backup disks for other files alongside your Time Machine backups. Just don’t touch the Backups.backupdb folder! The Finder will protect it to some extent; it doesn’t let you modify things in there, but it will let you delete and add things.
  • The Script

    Most of the things in the tmMakeImage script can be found on the net going back to 2007, but you’ll still find recent answers on the internet saying it can’t be done.

Mac OS X Command Line: Start a process and pick it up later

I can’t believe I’ve only just discovered the gnu screen command. You want to kick off a long running command line process and come back to it later? Like so:

  • Open a Terminal window
  • Type screen
  • Type ls -R /
  • Quit Terminal, and hum to yourself for a few seconds
  • Open a new Terminal window and type screen -R

Now that’s what I call magic.

It survives logouts and is of course an essential for working with remote or cloud machines over ssh; when your network connection fails you can log back in and carry on. man screen will tell you more, although so will https://www.bing.com/search?q=linux+screen