Category Archives: Code

Software Development

Boot Camp drivers for Windows 8 for Mac

It turns out that Windows 8 is largely the same as Windows 7 as far as drivers go, so most Mac/Boot Camp users on Windows 7 waiting for Apple to release Windows 8 drivers can just go ahead and install Windows 8 on an existing Windows 7 partition.

If you are upgrading from anything earlier – Vista or XP – then you will have to download the latest BootCamp drivers – aka Windows Support Software – from Apple. The easy way to do this is to run Boot Camp Assistant from within OS X, and tick the box for ‘Download the latest Windows support software from Apple’.

If Boot Camp Assistant fails to download the drivers for you, then you can still get the by following instructions on /p682/download-bootcamp-drivers.

If you’ve removed OS X from your Mac and have to do the download in Windows, then you’ll also need this page /p860/opening-a-bootcamp-driver-download-on-windows-7-or-8-with-7-zip

A couple of people have reported that the drivers don’t work 100%. I’m not sure which models work completely, all I can tell you is that for my Core2 Duo MacBookPro everything works fine, including the camera, backlit keyboard, and screen resolution.

VS2010 Command Prompt Here on the Windows Explorer Right Click Menu — the .reg File

VS2010 Command Line Here for Explorer Right Click Menu

To add a Visual Studio 2010 Command Prompt Here to your Explorer Right-Click menu, save this as a .reg file to your desktop, and then run it:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\Folder\shell\Command Line VS2010]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\Folder\shell\Command Line VS2010\command]
@="cmd.exe /k echo on & pushd \"%1\" & \"C:\\Program Files\\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\\VC\\vcvarsall.bat\" x86"

If you have 64-bit Windows, you’ll need this:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\Folder\shell\Command Line VS2010]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\Folder\shell\Command Line VS2010\command]
@="cmd.exe /k echo on & pushd \"%1\" & \"C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\\VC\\vcvarsall.bat\" x86"

Can’t open Asp.Net MVC2 project in Visual Studio 2010 – Microsoft.WebApplication.targets was not found

You try to open an MVC2 project that worked on a previous machine but won’t open on your new machine? The error message you get when you try to open the project is:

error MSB4019: The imported project “C:\Program Files\MSBuild\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v9.0\WebApplications\Microsoft.WebApplication.targets” was not found. Confirm that the path in the declaration is correct, and that the file exists on disk.

Possibly your new machine has never had Visual Studio 2008 on it, whereas your old machine did. In which case the solutions is:

  1. Find a machine on which VS2008 has been installed
  2. Copy the contents of C:\Program Files\MSBuild\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v9.0\WebApplications to your new machine

References

http://www.matthidinger.com/archive/2008/11/09/fixing-web-application-projects-with-automated-tfs-builds.aspx

How to create an NUnit test project that is also a self-running console app .exe

  1. Create your NUnit Test project as a Windows Console Application, not as a Class Library.
  2. Then make your main Program look like this:
    [TestFixture]
    public class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            NUnit.ConsoleRunner.Runner.Main(
                new[]{Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location }
                );
        }
    
        [TestCase("Aa - Bb")]
        public void WhenValidatingForename_should_accept_valid_characters(string validInput)
        {
            var result= new ClassUnderTest().Validate(validInput);
            Assert.IsTrue(result);
        }
    
        [TestCase("X<")]
        public void WhenValidatingForename_should_reject_invalid_characters(string invalidInput)
        {
            var result= new ClassUnderTest().Validate(invalidInput);
            Assert.IsFalse(result);
        }
    }
  3. Then, add a reference not only to nunit.framework.dll but also to nunit-console-runner.dll

You now have a self-running executable that runs all your tests, but still behaves in the usual way in a build script, or when running tests inside Visual Studio with TestRunner or Resharper or similar.
NB You may need to check if your build scripts are hard-coded to expect a Test project to be a .dll.